Wednesday, February 17, 2010

theispot.com and "save for web" solutions

I have a portfolio on theispot.com now - www.theispot.com/artist/jforson. I spent today setting it up, resizing images etc. Hopefully I won't get lost in the mix. One thing I noticed about the site, like most illustration venues, my work doesn't seem to fit the mold. I'm not sure if that's good or bad. On one hand I think it's good. It could mean that my work is original and breaks from the conventional. On the other hand it could mean I have a style that doesn't attract clients. I think a lot of illustrators compromise their artistic integrity in order to have a more salable service, and attract those ever lucrative advertising budgets. I'm not willing to go there just yet. Maybe when I have kids to feed or something, but for now I'd rather do work I'm proud of.

Something I've been irritated with for a few years has been how my images look when I save them for the web. I spend a lot of time getting them just how I want in Photoshop, then I save for web, and suddenly they look washed out and dead! I thought this was just because they were being compressed, and that was the nature of the beast, so I would up the contrast and saturation before saving them for web to counter this phenomenon. Well, yesterday I did some digging, and found out that there IS a solution! It has to do with the color profile, something I knew nothing about until I read this creativepro.com article. I read it, I tried it, it worked beautifully. I love finding the answer to an annoying problem!

2 comments:

Brian Bowes said...

Hey Jeremy,

Your work is looking great as ever. The new ispot page is coming together nicely, good work!

I wouldn't sweat "fitting the mold," your work is iconic, well designed, and beautifully crafted. You're care and attention to detail shine through. Keep challenging yourself, and clients of like mind to you will be attracted. Break the molds man.

Cheers,

Jeremy Forson said...

Thanks Brian. I don't really sweat not fitting the mold too much. I think that it's a good idea to simply do the work you like, and if you're making cool stuff the right clients will find you like you said.